Third MSW Student Awarded LTJ Fellowship

Incoming Master of Social Work (MSW) student Eman Ghoneim now joins her fellow incoming MSW student Quinten Harris and current student Alisia Taylor Sullivan in receiving this tremendous fellowship. Sullivan is completing her first year of the fellowship.

In an effort to contribute to the mission of enhancing diversity, the University of Kentucky established the Lyman T. Johnson Postdoctoral Fellowships to support postdoctoral fellows in graduate and professional areas. The fellowship is named in honor of UK’s first African American graduate student, Lyman T. Johnson.

Johnson, known as a desegregation pioneer, sued UK in 1949 after two failed attempts to enroll in the University’s graduate program. At the time, UK’s graduate school was completely segregated. The university held the stance that black and white students should not attend the same school, a stance that many institutions across the nation held.

By April of 1949, Federal Judge H. Church Ford ruled that UK must admit black students to the university. Through Johnson’s actions, it became possible for future black students to be a part of the graduate program.

The LTJ Fellowship is awarded to first-year or continuing graduate students. Candidates for eligibility contribute to the University of Kentucky’s compelling interest in diversity, is a first-generation college student and exemplifies leadership, extracurricular activities, awards and recognition, and/or community service. 

Fellowship recipients pursue an individualized research program under the mentorship of one or more UK professors and actively participate in departmental and professional research-related activities. Fellows play a lead role in designing, developing, and implementing research programs that contribute to a department’s overall graduate education and research mandates.

The fellowship provides a $47,476 stipend plus benefits. In addition, the fellow receives $2,000 for support of research activities. Fellowships are available for up to two years. The initial appointment is for 12 months, but recipients may apply for a second year.

Loeffler Awarded 2020 Outstanding Teaching Award

Each year, the University of Kentucky recognizes faculty and graduate teaching assistants for outstanding teaching during its UK Faculty Awards Ceremony. The Outstanding Teaching Awards annually recognizes faculty and graduate teaching assistants who go above and beyond what is expected of them.

For the first time in the 18-year history of the UK Faculty Awards, the College of Social Work (CoSW) is proud to announce that Dr. Diane Loeffler, Director of Undergraduate Studies, is a recipient of a 2020 Outstanding Teaching Award.

“We are extremely proud of, and for, Dr. Loeffler,” said Jay Miller, CoSW dean. “Dr. Loeffler’s commitment to quality instruction and student experience is unparalleled. We are extremely fortunate to have her as part of our CoSW family.”

Loeffler was awarded this prestigious honor in Category 2, which recognizes lecturer and clinical title series faculty for outstanding performance in the classroom, laboratory, or clinical settings.

“Winning this award was very overwhelming – there are so many gifted teachers at UK, and it is truly an honor to be recognized as being among those great educators,” Loeffler said. “I wouldn’t have become the teacher I am without the steadfast encouragement and support from so many UK faculty past and present.”

After graduating from high school in the Twin Cities, Loeffler obtained her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science at the University of Iowa (UI). While there, she said she encountered some of the best educators around, such as Dr. Joel Barkan and Dr. John Nelson, who encouraged her to take flight and to think critically about inequities and social problems.

“It is likely that neither ever knew the impact they made on me and how I approach teaching and working with students,” she said.

After graduating from U of I, Loeffler headed south, where she spent time working with a housing nonprofit in Central Appalachia. Loeffler decided to pursue a career in social work after working for a few nonprofit organizations in the Southeastern United States. The work she was doing was largely around affordable housing and community development.

Realizing she didn’t have the tools and skills needed to be equipped to help create systemic change, Loeffler pursued a Master of Social Work (MSW) – a natural fit for her which provided her with the education needed to become more successful in community development work that was meaningful and impactful.

“The social work profession has deep and meaningful ties to work around social justice and equity, and this was important to me when I was deciding in what area I wanted to pursue graduate studies,” Loeffler said.

Loeffler earned her MSW and Ph.D. at the University of Kentucky, a move that allowed her to stay connected to the communities she had worked in and to the social issues she was passionate about.

Loeffler said she was fortunate to be able to complete her post-doctoral work and become a member of the faculty at UK CoSW.

“I’ve been on faculty in the College since 2007, and in 2019 I was asked to serve as the Director of Undergraduate Studies,” Loeffler said. “It is a challenging and rewarding way to deepen my commitment to undergraduate education and to – hopefully – positively impact the lives of our students.

Contributing to her passion to better others and the world around her, what drives Loeffler is the understanding that the work she does is a privilege. As a professor who has the opportunity to teach elective courses, Loeffler loves getting the chance to interact with students from many different disciplines and professions.

“When a classroom is humming with discussion and dialogue and students are really working together to challenge one another – that drives me to keep doing this work,” Loeffler exclaimed.

For a list of previous winners, visit here. For media inquiries, please contact Kaitlyn Brooks at Kaitlyn.brooks@uky.edu.

UK Collaborative Team Receives Funding To Refurbish & Provide Essential Medical Equipment

Students watch as Dr. Pat Kitzman teaches how to refurbish medical equipment.

Roughly 1 in 7 Americans live with a disability that impacts daily mobility. The average cost of a wheelchair ranges from $500 to $2,000 without insurance, seriously curbing access to this essential equipment for patients who lack proper coverage. The UK Center of Excellence in Rural Health (CERH) in Hazard is working to bridge this gap for Kentucky patients through a project that repairs and redistributes used medical equipment to communities in need. 

Project CARAT—short for Coordinating and Assisting the Reuse of Assistive Technology— began in 2013 as a collaborative Health Resources and Services Administration Grant (HRSA) with CERH, the UK Physical Therapy program, and the Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation where two CARAT sites opened—one in Hazard and the other in Thelma. Within the last seven years, three additional sites in Lexington, Louisville, and Paducah have been added.

In order to expand the reach of the Hazard facility, CERH, the UK College of Health Sciences and the UK College of Social Work partnered in applying for a 2020 UK Sustainability Challenge Grant and the project was funded. This funding will allow the programs to work collaboratively to provide a larger number of refurbished equipment items to individuals in need and increase opportunities for community members to engage with the project at various levels.  

Keisha Hudson, CERH’s administrative research assistant said each CARAT site is unique in terms of need for equipment, and community support will impact the project’s continued success.

“We hope to increase engagement with the public,” she said. “Community-donated equipment is crucial to our success and we hope more awareness of our mission will result in equipment donations and greater access to care.” 

Used canes, walkers, and wheelchairs can easily be repurposed for additional use. Unfortunately, most of this medically necessary equipment is thrown out after acquiring wear and tear. The team behind Project CARAT works to repair, sanitize, and rehome used equipment in local communities.

Used medical equipment stored in new Project CARAT facility thanks to HRSA grant funding.

“If you drive up and down your streets, it’s amazing the number of wheelchairs and walkers you will find waiting for the garbage truck. There’s also tons of equipment in landfills,” said Pat Kitzman, PT, Ph.D., professor in physical therapy and a founder of Project CARAT. “We have a supply, and we have a need, but we did not have the go-between until now.”

Kitzman said the project was also borne from challenges he faced as a home health physical therapist. His first-hand experience has impacted both the project’s overarching mission and how he teaches his physical therapy students.

“I was always having to MacGyver somebody’s wheelchair because current insurance policies only allow patients to receive a new wheelchair every five years. They will not replace the chair sooner if something happens to it,” he said. “I knew our students, who will one day become future healthcare providers, would need this knowledge to help their patients.”

Frances Feltner, DNP, MSN, RN, FAAN, director of CERH, added she hopes Project CARAT will provide sustainable solutions and continuous expansion for much-needed care in rural Kentucky.

“Serving people is at the heart of everything we do. Project CARAT is giving patients the equipment they need, providing greater health care resources, and looking at the real needs of each individual community,” she said. “This type of precision care is a building block to addressing health disparities in our communities and in our state.”

“This project was a natural fit for our social work students,” said Melissa Slone, MSW, UK College of Social Work East program coordinator at CERH. “Accessing resources, providing services, and breaking down barriers is what social workers do.”

“What we do is not for the glory of the grant,” Feltner continued. “It’s to provide services for people who truly need them.”

Kay Hoffman Receives CSWE Award

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) proudly announces the recipients of the 2020 Professional Recognition Awards.

Professor and dean emerita of the College of Social Work (CoSW), Dr. Kay Hoffman has been named a recipient of the 2020 Professional Recognition Awards.

Dr. Hoffman will receive the Faculty Service and Leadership Award in Social Work Education Award from the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). It recognizes a social work educator with 10 or more years of service excellence whose work has advanced and promoted social work education and provided a significant contribution to extend its reach.

“As former dean of CoSW, Dr. Hoffman was ahead of her time. Her visionary leadership put CoSW on a path that yields benefits still today,” said Jay Miller, CoSW dean. “This recognition of her work and impact is well deserved.”

Having served the University of Kentucky and CoSW for 20 years, Dr. Hoffman retired in 2018. Although having retired, Dr. Hoffman continues her work with Ph.D. students and supervises an evaluation team of researchers examining prevention responses in child welfare and public health.

At UK she was the Dorothy A. Miller Professor in Social Work Education and a member of the Kentucky Institute of Medicine. Her scholarly work is in social work education, child welfare, and international social work.

“We are glad to present the Faculty Service and Leadership Award to Dr. Hoffman in recognition of her many years as a leader of social work programs and as an educator who supported countless students, researchers, and faculty,” Darla Spence Coffey, Ph.D., MSW, CSWE president, and CEO, said. “Social work education is indebted to the contributions she made through her service to the Commission on Accreditation and as president of CSWE when she led the movement to competency-based outcomes. Even two years into retirement, Dr. Hoffman finds ways to support social work students.”

Coffey said CSWE is glad to continue its annual acknowledgment of remarkable social workers, educators, and students with these awards. She noted that the recipients of the Professional Recognition Awards represent the best of the best among social work educators.

Dr. Hoffman continues to be active in her local community, having served as the president of the Plantory, an incubator for nonprofit organizations, and president of the Center on Human Entrepreneurship Solutions Group. Presently, she is a board member of the Peninsula Art Academy. Read more about Dr. Hoffman here.

The CSWE Board of Directors selected the recipients of the 2020 awards from a slate of nominees.

Other award winners include:

Rebecca Gomez, Ph.D., LCSW, director of the Our Lady of the Lake University Ph.D. program, will receive the Distinguished Recent Contributions to Social Work Education Award, which recognizes the achievements of a social work educator within the last 10 years.

Alice Gates, Ph.D., MSW, associate professor, BSW program director, and department chair of sociology/social work at the University of Portland, will receive the Early Career Faculty Service and Leadership in Social Work Education Award. It recognizes a social work educator with fewer than 10 years of service who has advanced and promoted social work education and provided significant contributions to extend its reach.

Betty J. Ruth, clinical professor and director of the MSW/MPH program at Boston University School of Social Work, will receive the Significant Lifetime Achievement in Social Work Education Award, which recognizes the achievements of a social work educator over an entire career.

The honorees will be presented with their awards during the 2020 CSWE Annual Program Meeting, November 12‒15.

About CSWE
Founded in 1952, the Council on Social Work Education is the national association representing social work education in the United States. Its members include over 800 accredited baccalaureate and master’s degree social work programs, as well as individual social work educators, practitioners, and agencies dedicated to advancing quality social work education.

CoSW Welcomes First Summer Online MSW Cohort

From just down the street in Lexington, to as south as Florida, as east as Massachusetts, and as far away as Alaska and Germany, students are pursuing the College of Social Work’s (CoSW) online Master of Social Work (MSW) program this summer.

The CoSW is now delivering a high-quality social work education to practitioners who otherwise would not be able to access it because of their location. Providing the MSW in an online format allows CoSW to truly manifest the land grant mission of the University of Kentucky.

Now, students have yet another option for entering that program.

Earlier this spring, CoSW announced that the online program would accept its first summer cohort with students from coast to coast, from California to North Carolina. Though widely accessible, CoSW remains committed to the Commonwealth, with 41% of the incoming summer cohort hailing from the Commonwealth.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, with job growth projected at a rate of 16% through 2026—about double the national average—social workers are in high demand to provide support across educational settings, family services, health care settings, and policymaking, to name a few. And, with the majority of mental health services in the U.S. provided by social workers, the need to expand the MSW program into an online format was crucial.

“It is imperative that future practitioners have access to a quality social work education, delivered by world-class faculty,” explained Kalea Benner, Director of Graduate Programs. “The CoSW, through the new online program, is now able to deliver this opportunity to students, no matter where students call home.”

The accredited, online MSW is available in both advanced and regular standing program options. Advanced standing, for those with a 3.5 social work GPA in their Bachelor of Social Work program within the past seven years, is a 30-credit hour program that can be completed in an accelerated model in two semesters, one short academic year. The regular standing option is a 60-credit hour program for students who have an undergraduate degree in any discipline that can be completed in four semesters, just two academic years. The MSW program options feature quality, practice-focused instruction from social work leaders at the forefront of innovation in the field.

Additionally, students in the online MSW program can specialize their educational experience by attaining a graduate certificate during the course of the MSW program. Certificate options including Child Welfare Practice, Clinical Social Work, or Military Behavioral Health, School Social Work and Substance Use Disorder are available to students in the online MSW program.   

“We have made substantive investments to ensure that the student experience in our online program is second to none,” said CoSW Dean Jay Miller. “From the outset, we want our students to know that they are receiving adept instruction, rooted in best-practices associated with online education delivery. At the end of the day, we are preparing them to deal with the complex practice realities facing individuals, groups, and communities. That is not something we take lightly.” 

For more information about the online MSW program at CoSW, visit MSW program website or text MSW to 31996 or email MSW@uky.edu.

New Cohort of IBH Students Awarded $290,000

When financial barriers prevent hard-working students from succeeding in college, every penny in scholarships and grants can make a difference. With the University of Kentucky’s top priority being centered on student success, faculty from colleges across campus are doing what they can to help students succeed.

The College of Social Work, in collaboration with faculty in the College of Health Sciences and the College of Medicine, has been awarded a new Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant to prepare students and health care professionals for work in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare settings.

Karen Badger, a professor in the College of Health Sciences with a joint appointment in the College of Social Work, is the principal investigator of the project. Pamela Weeks, director of field education and clinical associate professor in the College of Social Work, and Janet Ford, an associate professor in the College of Social Work, are coinvestigators.

The purpose of this grant is to improve access to behavioral health services in Kentucky for vulnerable and underserved individuals and communities by increasing the number of well-prepared behavioral health social workers in primary healthcare settings. The grant also supports interprofessional healthcare education and specialized training to students, faculty, and healthcare providers.

For academic year 20/21, 29 students who are participating in the IBH program will receive $290,000 in financial support through HRSA IBH stipends.  The IBH Cognate Area of Study is offered on UK’s main campus and at UK MSW satellite sites in Eastern Kentucky to full and part-time MSW students in their last 30 credit hours of the MSW program.  Full-time students earning an MSW are eligible for a $10,000 stipend, while part-time students are eligible for a $5,000 stipend.

HRSA reported that national projections of supply and demand for behavioral health practitioners predict significant shortages by 2025. This shortage of health professionals is even more acute in rural areas. The project is designed to improve access to behavioral health services for patients in underserved communities by increasing the number of well-prepared social workers entering the workforce.

“IBH students will learn how to address behavioral health concerns including mental illness, family violence, psychological trauma, and substance misuse, as well as behavioral components in conditions such as diabetes, insomnia, and chronic pain,” Weeks explained. “A well-trained, competent behavioral health workforce is necessary to meet our nation’s growing need and the rapidly changing health care environment. MSW IBH students will integrate classroom learning with hands-on clinical experience in primary care settings to offer access to services for patients with a wide range of behavioral health problems.”

In addition to financial assistance for students, the grant team and their community partners aim to improve patient access to integrated behavioral health services in primary care settings. Under the new grant, additional specialized IBH field education sites [BKS1] have been developed to expand the project in Central and Eastern Kentucky in order to prepare students to join the integrated health care workforce.

Read more about the IBH Cognate Certificate here. Interested students should contact Pam Weeks at plweeks@uky.edu.

CoSW Offers New Virtual Trainings for Foster Parents

As with most in-person programs, changing to a virtual format has been more than necessary to continue providing services amidst a global pandemic.

One such program from the Office of Foster and Adoptive Support and Training, the Medically Complex Training Program, is no exception. Housed within the University of Kentucky’s Training Resource Center, the Medically Complex Training Program provides training to resource parents in Kentucky caring for children in out-of-home care with complex medical needs.

In keeping with the commitment to provide training and resources to foster families, including those wishing to care for children who are medically complex, the program transitioned into a virtual environment. In mid-May, the Medically Complex Training Program held its’ first virtual Join Hands Together Training for medically complex foster parents, an overall success with 70 trainees in attendance.

One training participant said, “I became the medically complex liaison over a year ago…after being an ongoing worker for 5-6 years. If you all are recording these, it would be a GREAT resource for ongoing workers to see as well! I wish I had some of these trainings years ago. Thank you for doing them!”

The Join Hands Together Training is typically an in-person training lasting almost 7 hours. Foster parents are required to attend this training in order to become medically complex foster parents. But the added benefit of switching to a virtual platform allowed Lisa Casebier, Medical Foster Care Specialist, to split the training into two days.

“When we switched to a virtual training, we decided to have two days of training, Part I & Part II, with one training being 3.75 hours and one 3 hours. This way foster parents did not have to sit in front of a computer for an extended period of time,” Casebier explained. 

Casebier said they also had two offerings for Part 1 and two offerings for Part II, allowing foster parents the option to choose the time that best suited them. The training was held in the Zoom Webinar format, allowing attendees to hear and see the presenter, respond to polls throughout the training, and gave them the ability to ask questions throughout with the Chat and Q&A features. The plan is to continue providing virtual trainings every other week using the more interactive Zoom Meeting format.

“The panelists answered questions as they came in and the presenter was able to continue with the presentation,” Casebier said. “There was no lag time in the attendees getting their questions answered.”

Casebier, in addition to being Medically Complex Training Program Coordinator, was also the training’s presenter. Casebier has been in her position for a little over 7 years, having worked as the Director of NICU and NBN at Frankfort Regional Medical Center for 3 years and as a nurse at the University of Kentucky’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for 16 years previously.

The panel consisted of Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Department for Community Based Services (DCBS) Nurse Administrators, Mary Thompson and Alice Scheffler.

The mission of the Medically Complex Training Program is to provide training to resource parents in Kentucky caring for children in out-of-home care with complex medical needs.

Since 2003, the program has developed, coordinated, and conducted this type of training for foster/adoptive parents and social service workers statewide. The guidelines for training content are established by the CHFS DCSB Standards of Practice, as well as Kentucky law.

For more information about the Medically Complex Training Program, visit https://socialwork.uky.edu/office-of-foster-and-adoptive-support-and-training/ or contact Casebier at 859-257-5162 or Lisa.casebier@uky.edu.

Settling for More: UK Grad Overcomes Substance Misuse, Loss to Become Prevention Specialist

Have you ever pictured a moment so vividly you could feel it ­— the joy or sadness that accompanied what you were wearing and who you were with?

For Luke Ramey, there’s one moment in particular.

He’s dressed in a blue cap and gown while proudly walking across the Rupp Arena stage — putting one foot in front of the other until his outstretched hand reaches that coveted diploma. He’s chatting with mentors who helped guide him to success. But the celebration doesn’t stop after the tassels have been turned. There are family members giving warm hugs without warning and genuine smiles being captured in countless photos.

“I thought about how I might hang those pictures in my home and office,” Ramey said. “But as the late John Lennon once said, ‘Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans.’”

Ramey is no stranger to life not going according to plan. Behind every success, he has a story filled with struggle.

Now 37 years old, Ramey recalls growing up in Winchester, Kentucky, in a comfortable home surrounded by loving parents. But a traumatic experience as a toddler would have a profound impact moving forward.

“I was sexually assaulted when I was only 4 years old. At the time, I did not understand how the assault affected or influenced my thought processes or behaviors,” Ramey said. “But I did have a strong intuition that something about me was different from the rest of my peers.”

Ramey had difficulty maintaining positive relationships. In high school, he often felt awkward and uncomfortable — even around his close friends. As that social discomfort intensified, Ramey found a coping mechanism.

“I’ve struggled with a substance use disorder for most of my adult life,” he said. “When alcohol and drugs were introduced to me, I found a way out of the discomfort.”

Ramey’s life began to spiral out of control. That became even more apparent during a tragic incident following his high school graduation — a confrontation the local newspaper labeled “a drug deal gone bad.”

“My friend got involved in a conflict that ended up with him being thrown from the car,” Ramey explained. “I was one of a few people that held him in the middle of the street as the EMS arrived, and it was clear to me — he was not going to make it.”

At just 18 years old, Ramey had experienced immense loss, which led to crippling anxiety. “I spent the next 13 years of my life running from physical, mental and emotional pain.”

Falling victim to the relentless grip of substance misuse —​ Ramey admits resigning himself to a life not worth living.

*****

For Ramey, the crash of hitting rock bottom was painful — but necessary.

“On September 29, 2013, I stopped using drugs and alcohol and have been sober ever since.”

That was just the beginning of Ramey’s upward climb. While working in a treatment center, he discovered his true passion and purpose — helping others achieve and sustain lasting recovery.

“I took an entry level social work course at Bluegrass Community Technical College, and I knew that’s what I wanted to do,” Ramey said. “The ability to help and to serve people and communities on so many different levels attracted me, and I felt as though I finally found a true calling.”

Determined to better his life — and the lives of those in the same position as he once was —​ Ramey transferred to the University of Kentucky College of Social Work in the fall of 2018.

He felt more prepared than ever to earn a college degree. But going back to school wasn’t without challenges. As a man with many titles — full-time employee, devoted husband and dedicated father of four — time was hard to come by.

“Sometimes, I was awake for more than 24 hours. I would take small naps in my car between classes,” Ramey recalled. “There were times I didn’t think I was going to be able to continue working as much as I was and be able to complete school.”

Ramey’s wife and young children served as his inspiration. And their support became a valuable source of strength. “Without the support of my loving wife, children, family and friends, I don’t know that I would have completed,” he said. “They all pushed me to succeed.”

Ramey also gives credit to his “second family” for helping him achieve academic success.

“All of the faculty in the College of Social Work were incredibly helpful along my educational journey,” he said. “The educators and advisors provided an environment for me to learn in which I felt safe, confident and encouraged.”

Ramey’s journey at UK is far from over. He is currently employed as a prevention specialist with the HEALing Communities Study, which leverages existing resources and initiatives, in partnership with communities, to implement strategies and set evidence-based standards that will become a national model for fighting the opioid epidemic.

“Luke’s journey to the CoSW is such an inspiration to the UK community,” Jay Miller, dean of the CoSW, said. “His persistence and perseverance are a powerful of example of how individuals can leverage their life experiences for a common good.” 

This fall, Ramey will begin working toward his master’s degree with the goal of becoming a licensed clinical social worker and a licensed certified drug and alcohol counselor.

“The CoSW has not only prepared me to be successful professionally, but they have all helped me to succeed in life. They set the example of advocacy, compassion and diligence,” he continued. “Since the COVID-19 pandemic hit Lexington, the dean, faculty and staff have poured their hearts into redesigning curriculums and regulations to coincide with new social norms. They have worked tirelessly to ensure that each and every one of us has the resources we need to finish our educational journey.”

*****

Ramey may never get the Commencement ceremony he so vividly pictured. As a result of COVID-19, those congratulatory hugs and handshakes will have to wait.

“A moment of clarity came to me — there might not be a better way for a social worker to start off their career than with an act of love and humanity, such as social distancing,” he said.

Ramey’s willing to do what social workers do best — protect the vulnerable. But when it comes to pushing boundaries and pursuing goals, he’s encouraging others never to settle.

“You can and will achieve your dreams if you’re just willing to reach for it and accept the help that is available.”

Celebrating Our Students

While students around the globe are wrapping up their finals and preparing for graduation, the platform for recognizing students, and their accomplishments, has shifted.

In April, the College of Social Work (CoSW) held the 2020 Honors and Awards Ceremony. The ceremony, which occurred virtually, was live-streamed on YouTube.

During the ceremony, several awards were presented. BASW student Sabri Williams received the Dean’s Service Award. Students Tanya Brewer, Rebekah Davis, and Luke Ramey were named Outstanding BASW Student awardees. The Outstanding MSW Student award was given to Travis Adams, William ‘Ace’ Jackson III, and Shaniek Tose. Ace Jackson III and Luke Ramey were the student speakers for the event.
 
To finish the semester at such an unprecedented time is truly commendable. Please join CoSW in congratulating all of our students for an outstanding semester and THANKING all those who made their journey possible.

CoSW faculty and staff celebrated the accomplishments
of BASW, MSW, and Ph.D. students during a virtual
2020 Honors and Awards Ceremony.

Incoming graduate student awarded UK’s Lyman T. Johnson Fellowship.

In an effort to contribute to the mission of enhancing diversity, the University of Kentucky established the Lyman T. Johnson Postdoctoral Fellowships to support postdoctoral fellows in graduate and professional areas. The fellowships are named in honor of UK’s first African American graduate student, Lyman T. Johnson.

Incoming Master of Social Work (MSW) student Quinten Harris and current student Alisia Taylor Sullivan has been awarded this tremendous fellowship. Sullivan is completing her first year of the fellowship.

The LTJ Fellowship is awarded to first-year or continuing graduate students. Candidates for eligibility contribute to the University of Kentucky’s compelling interest in diversity, is a first-generation college student and exemplifies leadership, extracurricular activities, awards and recognition, and/or community service. 

Fellowship recipients pursue an individualized research program under the mentorship of one or more UK professors and actively participate in departmental and professional research-related activities. Fellows play a lead role in designing, developing and implementing research programs that contribute to a department’s overall graduate education and research mandates.

The fellowship provides a $47,476 stipend plus benefits. In addition, the fellow receives $2,000 for support of research activities. Fellowships are available for up to two years. The initial appointment is for 12 months, but recipients may apply for a second year.